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What we Teach

The following table lists the undergraduate English modules that have recently run. Please note that not all the modules listed in this table will run each year, while we also often add new modules reflecting our staff's latest research.

The table is divided into level 4, 5, and 6 modules. You will take level 4 modules in your first year and you will typically take level 5 modules in your second year and level 6 modules in your final year. Modules are loosely arranged into seven broad subject areas, and you can use the menu on the right to filter the modules by area.

Module TitleCodeLevelSemesterCreditsDescription
ArchitextsESH243BLevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This module will introduce Associate students to the intellectual and political legacies of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by way of critical post-Marxist, Niezschean, and Freudian thnkers. Student will read from a viariety of seminal theoretical texts, which trace a number of genealogies in modern thought.
Introduction to Old EnglishESH253Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module will introduce you to the earliest literature in English, as well as to the earliest recorded form of the English language. The Old English period (fifth to mid-twelfth century) saw both the conversion of the English to Christianity and their introduction to writing and reading in the Roman alphabet. Its literature is accordingly a mixed one, poised between an oral, pagan past and a literate, Christian future. Both prose and verse texts will be read during the module. On completion of the module, you will be able to read Old English texts for yourself with the help of a glossary, and you will be well placed to pursue the study of Old English language and literature to a more advanced level. You will also gain an appreciation of the importance of the advent of literacy in the period for the development of new literary genres and form, and learn something of the preoccupations of the oral poetic performances that preceded literacy in England and the continental Germanic era.
Writing the First World WarESH256Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module examines a broad range of First World War writing. The First World War has traditionally been perceived and represented as a European conflict, defined by the tragic loss of life on the Western Front. We look at writing from and about the war in Europe and on the so-called Home Front (this may include authors such as Wilfred Owen, Katherine Mansfield, Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway). But, the war of 1914-18 was a global conflict. The imperial power of Europe in the early-twentieth century and the involvement of the Ottoman Empire meant that people from around the world were drawn into the war. Writing the First World War therefore also introduces less familiar texts (fiction, poetry, life writing, and archival sources such as films, photographs, letters and diaries) that enable us to engage with the war¿s global and imperial dimensions. We visit the Imperial War Museum to look at some of its amazing archives and, in previous years, we've gone on a class trip to Western Front to see how the British, French, German, Indian, African, American, Canadian, Chinese, Australian (the list could go on¿) men who served and died there are commemorated.
Terror, Transgression and Astonishment: the Gothic in the Long Nineteenth CenturyESH264Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115Why do writers so often find themselves compelled to write about the gruesome, sordid, creepy, or just terrifying? This module addresses this question by tracing such subject matter from the emergence of Gothic fiction in the late eighteenth century (the beginning of our "long" nineteenth century) to such nineteenth-century genres as the ghost story and the supernatural. (We will also look at some texts that are unclassifiably weird.) In doing this, we will see how the Gothic and related genres arise in relation to cultural and social trends such as the enlightenment, the advent of Republican government in United States, and shifting understandings of the family and sexuality.
ArchitextsESH243Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30This module allows students to explore systematically both the work of three influential thinkers - Marx, Nietzsche and Freud - and also the responses to and effects of their work in the thought of twentieth century intellectuals and theorists. Students will read a number of seminal theoretical texts, tracing critical genealogies of modern thought.
Architexts IESH243ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module allows students to explore systematically both the work of three influential thinkers - Marx, Nietzsche and Freud - and also the responses to and effects of their work in the thought of twentieth century intellectuals and theorists. Students will read a number of seminal theoretical texts, tracing critical genealogies of modern thought.
Renaissance Literary Culture IESH267ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115The period c. 1547-1600 is part of the `early modern¿: it is the beginning of modern philosophical, political and scientific thought and conceptions of the individual and society. It includes the Renaissance, a term which refers to the rebirth of classical civilization and the flourishing of arts and literature. This module will introduce this time of extraordinary cultural change and conflict through close reading of important authors including Wyatt, Marlowe, Sidney, Jonson, and Donne. It also offers the foundations for advanced study of early modern literature.
James Baldwin and American Civil RightsESH271Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module presents a mix of different sorts of representation of one great historical moment, that of Civil Rights in the US from the mid 1950s to the mid 1960s. The movement for Civil Rights marked a decisive moment in the making of our contemporary world; although the situation of blacks in the USA was not formally a colonial one, the social determination to break the bonds of racial subjugation was part and parcel of the world becoming 'postcolonial'; and it is an unfinished history, which still reverberates. The first few weeks focus on the novels, short stories and autobiographical reportage of one writer, James Baldwin. Baldwin was pretty much (though not quite) the first non-white American author. Thereafter we branch out to explore different writings and different forms of representation.
James Baldwin and American Civil RightsESH271Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This module presents a mix of different sorts of representation of one great historical moment, that of Civil Rights in the US from the mid 1950s to the mid 1960s. The movement for Civil Rights marked a decisive moment in the making of our contemporary world; although the situation of blacks in the USA was not formally a colonial one, the social determination to break the bonds of racial subjugation was part and parcel of the world becoming 'postcolonial'; and it is an unfinished history, which still reverberates. The first few weeks focus on the novels, short stories and autobiographical reportage of one writer, James Baldwin. Baldwin was pretty much (though not quite) the first non-white American author. Thereafter we branch out to explore different writings and different forms of representation.
Writing NowESH274Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215Students will read an analyse a range of contemporary writing (ideally published in the last two years) and will be able to consider contemporary modes of literary production and the function of the marketplace. The module aims to give students confidence in finding and responding to new work. Books on the reading list will include novels, essays, some poetry and short stories. There will also be room for students to choose their own texts for discussion.
Queering UtopiaESH275Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This module introduces students to the field of queer studies using a range of material in different media that represents a diversity of LGBTIQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, intersex and queer / questioning) experience since 1900. Writers and artists over the last century have produced work that has unsettled sex and gender binaries and challenged normative gendered constructions of the body, the family, community, race, and the nation. By engaging with a range of forms and genres we will consider how such work has queered the past and explored alternative futures, laying claim to new possibilities for cultural production, politics, and embodied subjectivity.
The Invention of America: American Literature, 1630 to the Early Twentieth CenturyESH277Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30This module surveys a rich array of American literature from the seventeenth century to the early 1900s; in doing so, it traces American social, cultural and intellectual history from the earliest colonial settlements to the emergence of the United States as a continental, globally-influential power. Issues to be addressed include the nature of religious belief in the colonial period; attitudes towards Native American amongst colonialists; early environmentalist consciousness; `Republican¿ or `patriotic¿ sexuality; slavery and ideas of `race¿; the experience of Americans in Europe; industry, immigration and the western frontier. Authors to be studied include Cooper, Emerson, Hawthorne, Douglass, Jacobs, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Chopin, and Cather.
Victorian FictionsESH279Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30This module will introduce students to a range of Victorian fiction. It addresses the content, form, and significance of the Victorian novel (famously nicknamed a `loose baggy monster¿) and how it develops amid the cultural, historical, and intellectual contexts of nineteenth-century Britain. It also examines the alternative form of the short story and considers what specific kinds of narrative and narrative effects this form enables. Authors to be studied may include Charlotte Brontë, Emily Brontë, Lewis Carroll, Wilkie Collins, Dinah Mulock Craik, Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Vernon Lee, Margaret Oliphant, Bram Stoker, and William Thackeray.
Victorian Fictions IESH279ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module will introduce students to a range of Victorian fiction. It addresses the content, form, and significance of the Victorian novel (famously nicknamed a `loose baggy monster¿) and how it develops amid the cultural, historical, and intellectual contexts of nineteenth-century Britain. It also examines the alternative form of the short story and considers what specific kinds of narrative and narrative effects this form enables. Authors to be studied may include Charlotte Brontë, Emily Brontë, Lewis Carroll, Wilkie Collins, Dinah Mulock Craik, Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Vernon Lee, Margaret Oliphant, Bram Stoker, and William Thackeray.
Victorian Fictions IIESH279BLevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This module will introduce students to a range of Victorian fiction. It addresses the content, form, and significance of the Victorian novel (famously nicknamed a `loose baggy monster¿) and how it develops amid the cultural, historical, and intellectual contexts of nineteenth-century Britain. It also examines the alternative form of the short story and considers what specific kinds of narrative and narrative effects this form enables. Authors to be studied may include Charlotte Brontë, Emily Brontë, Lewis Carroll, Wilkie Collins, Dinah Mulock Craik, Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Vernon Lee, Margaret Oliphant, Bram Stoker, and William Thackeray.
Renaissance Literary CultureESH267Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30The period c. 1547-1660 is known as the 'early modern': it is the beginning of modern philosophical, political and scientific thought and conceptions of the individual and society. It includes the
Renaissance, a term which refers to the rebirth of classical civilization and the flourishing of arts and literature. This module will introduce this time of extraordinary cultural change and conflict through close reading of important authors including Marlowe, Middleton, Sidney, Spenser, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Philips, and Milton. It also offers the foundations for advanced study of early modern literature.
The Invention of America: American Literature, 1870 to the Early Twentieth CenturyESH277BLevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This module surveys a rich array of American literature from (roughly) 1870 to the early 1900s; in doing so, it traces American social, cultural and intellectual history from the aftermath of the Civil War to the emergence of the United States as a continental, globally-influential power. Issues to be addressed include the contrasting novelistic philosophies and styles of Mark Twain and Henry James; the experience of Americans in Europe; antebellum 'race' relations; industry, immigration and the western frontier. Authors to be studied include Twain, James, James Weldon Johnson, Crane, Chopin, and Cather.
The Invention of America: American Literature, 1630 to 1865ESH277ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module surveys a rich array of American literature from the seventeenth century to c. 1865; in doing so, it traces American social, cultural and intellectual history from the earliest colonial settlements to the Civil War. Issues to be addressed include the nature of religious belief in the colonial period; attitudes towards Native American amongst colonialists; early environmentalist consciousness; `Republican¿ or `patriotic¿ sexuality; slavery and ideas of `race.' Authors to be studied include Cooper, Emerson, Hawthorne, Douglass, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.
Renaissance DramaESH280Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30Renaissance Drama offers an in-depth look at arguably the most exciting and innovative period of English drama: from late medieval religious drama, through the emergence of commercial theatre in the 1570s, the closure of theatres under the Long Parliament, to Restoration drama. It will investigate the preoccupations of early modern dramatists, as they wrote about their city and country, native citizens and exotic strangers, and developed the language and technical resources of the theatre. In Semester One we will examine London theatre, both through plays about the capital, and a walking tour of playhouse sites; this will lead into five weeks exploring how the theatre imagined itself and complicated the act of playing through meta-theatricality. In Semester Two we will be exploring two themes that appeared repeatedly in Renaissance plays ¿ early modern attitudes to strangers and others, and concepts of justice ¿ in order to understand the social conditions, attitudes and laws that shaped English lives in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Contemporary RealismsESH6040Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215The question of how fiction-writers can evoke the experiential realities of people¿s social and intimate lives is one that has ignited debates about the novel since the nineteenth century. But what does realism look like today? Is it preferable to speak not of realism but of a proliferation of multiple realisms, moving across diverse genres and thematic situations? This module explores the perpetually evolving relationship between the theoretical, philosophical and political claims of realist representation and literary fiction since 1980. Among the topics it will invite you to investigate are: realism¿s changing social and aesthetic capabilities; realism¿s radical adaptation by feminist writing and by the `novel of ideas¿; the reinvention of realism in historical fiction; and the relations between realism, testimony and new innovations in life-writing and autobiography. A module pack will accompany the syllabus, providing access to key critical resources for engaging with realism's literary history and on-going theorization.
Guillotines, Ghosts and Laughing Gas: Literature in the 1790sESH6041Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115The 1790s was a turbulent decade in which literature, politics and science interacted in unprecedented ways. Innovations in poetry coincided with a cult of Gothic horror, dramatic discoveries in science and an explosive pamphlet war unleashed by the French Revolution. This module explores the distinctive culture of the revolutionary decade, studying poems, novels and plays by Coleridge, Blake, Charlotte Smith, `Monk¿ Lewis, Sheridan and other writers alongside Jacobin and anti-Jacobin polemics, political cartoons and experiments with `laughing gas¿ in the laboratories of the poet-chemist Humphry Davy.
Creative Writing Prose FictionESH6043Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module is an introduction to writing prose fiction. Through practice-based workshops and seminars, the module explores the methodologies of writing fiction from a writer's perspective, and focuses on form, structure and narrative technique. The module is delivered through weekly creative writing exercises and immersion in a process of peer critique, as well as the critical analysis of sample texts.
Livelihoods in EnglishESH6044Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 10Livelihoods in English provides students with opportunities to consider and make action plans for the transition from university to working life. In this module, you will research career and further study opportunities for graduates of English, and research beyond conventional paths to examine volunteering, freelance work, and the world of the startup and digital media. It will ask you to consider what opportunities there are for you and how you can create yourselves as new entrants into the world of work. There will be a range of activities including: visiting speakers, networking events, independent research, group workshop tasks and the development of an individual livelihood 'Flight Plan'. Livelihoods in English encourages you to draw upon the thinking you have done on your degree about the values, ideologies and practices of the cultural and media industries, and to use that thinking to make empowered choices about work and livelihood.

The module will be taught via a series of weekly workshops in semester 1. Students will meet with their advisors in Semester 2 to discuss their Flight Plans.

The module is assessed on a pass/fail basis, based on satisfactory attendance at meetings of the module, and completion of an individual livelihood Flight Plan.
Renaissance Drama IESH280ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115Renaissance Drama I offers an in-depth look at arguably the most exciting and innovative period of English drama: from late medieval religious drama, through the emergence of commercial theatre in the 1570s, the closure of theatres under the Long Parliament, to Restoration drama. It will investigate the preoccupations of early modern dramatists, as they wrote about their city and country, native citizens and exotic strangers, and developed the language and technical resources of the theatre. We will examine London theatre, both through plays about the capital, and a walking tour of playhouse sites; this will lead into five weeks exploring how the theatre imagined itself and complicated the act of playing through meta-theatricality.
Chaucer: Telling Medieval TalesESH282Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215Chaucer's Canterbury Tales offer to modern readers the opportunity to explore many different kinds of medieval narrative: romances, pious stories, tragedies and knockabout comedies, for example, peopled with characters ranging from kings and saints to workmen and students. Some tales are set in the distant past, others in fourteenth-century English settings that would have been familiar to Chaucer's early readers. Different verse forms or alternations of verse and prose create other kinds of variety, and the overall framework of the pilgrimage on which the tales are supposedly recounted allows for a number of dramatic effects. This module will explore The Canterbury Tales as a work designed to explore narrative variety and its possibilities. We will read and compare a selection of tales in Chaucer's Middle English, looking at such matters as their sources and the construction of their narrators; and we will look at some other medieval experiments with framed tale collections. We will also spend time on the early dissemination of The Canterbury Tales, taking the opportunity to work closely with manuscript sources available online.
Arthurian Literature from Geoffrey of Monmouth to Game of ThronesESH283Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30This module studies the legend of King Arthur from its earliest literary expression in the twelfth century to the present day. The story of King Arthur and his court has always had an international appeal. Its first great promoter (Geoffrey of Monmouth) was Welsh; its first great poet (Chrétien de Troyes) was French; Arthurian narratives were rapidly translated into all major (and some minor) European languages. The modern Arthur is as much the property of Mark Twain and Hollywood as Alfred Lord Tennyson and T.H. White. This module therefore tracks the development of the Arthurian legend across time and space. We will look particularly at the way in which Arthurian literature opens a space for experimental writing, for sexual adventure and piety in almost equal measure, and for a surprisingly large number of female characters. The texts studied in semester one and the early part of semester two will be predominantly medieval; in the latter half of semester two we will explore the rich vein of Arthuriana from the nineteenth century onwards, culminating in an exploration of the Arthurian roots of HBO¿s hit series, Game of Thrones.
Arthurian Literature from Geoffrey of Monmouth to Game of ThronesESH283ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module studies the legend of King Arthur from its earliest literary expression in the twelfth century to the present day. The story of King Arthur and his court has always had an international appeal. Its first great promoter (Geoffrey of Monmouth) was Welsh; its first great poet (Chrétien de Troyes) was French; Arthurian narratives were rapidly translated into all major (and some minor) European languages. The modern Arthur is as much the property of Mark Twain and Hollywood as Alfred Lord Tennyson and T.H. White. This module therefore tracks the development of the Arthurian legend across time and space. We will look particularly at the way in which Arthurian literature opens a space for experimental writing, for sexual adventure and piety in almost equal measure, and for a surprisingly large number of female characters. The texts studied in semester one and the early part of semester two will be predominantly medieval; in the latter half of semester two we will explore the rich vein of Arthuriana from the nineteenth century onwards, culminating in an exploration of the Arthurian roots of HBO¿s hit series, Game of Thrones.
Postcolonial and Global LiteraturesESH285Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30ESH285 Postcolonial and Global Literatures offers a year-long selective survey of global and postcolonial literatures, adopting an expansive conception of what 'postcolonial' might signal and signify, in order to introduce you to a range of writing - from Africa, South Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Australasia, and Britain itself - that responds to, challenges, and engages with the legacies of colonialism, decolonisation, nationalism, neo-colonialism and neo-liberalism in twentieth-century and contemporary literary and cultural production.
Postcolonial and Global LiteraturesESH285ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115Postcolonial and Global Literatures offers a selective survey of global and postcolonial literatures, adopting an expansive conception of what 'postcolonial' might signal and signify, in order to introduce you to a range of writing -- from Africa, South Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Australasia, and Britain itself -- that responds to, challenges, and engages with the legacies of colonialism, decolonisation, nationalism, neo-colonialism and neo-liberalism in twentieth-century and contemporary literary and cultural production.
Romantics and RevolutionariesESH286Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30The Romantic movement originated in the revival of balladry and song and later absorbed the political and intellectual energies of the French Revolution, transforming received modes of expression and sparking a far-reaching debate on the power of the imagination and the nature of authorship. Studying poets and prose writers from 1760 to 1830, this module traces the development of the Romantic aesthetic, highlighting national and regional traditions within `British¿ Romanticism while also exploring its imaginative engagement with the wider world. Among the authors studied are Blake, Wordsworth, Keats, Hazlitt, Anna Barbauld, Burns and Thomas Moore.
Romantics and Revolutionaries IESH286ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115The Romantic Movement, which originated in the ballad and song revival of the 1760s, later absorbed the political and intellectual energies of the French Revolution, transforming received modes of expression and sparking a far-reaching debate on the power of the imagination and the nature of authorship. This module explores the development of the Romantic aesthetic, concentrating on poetry and prose of the 'first-generation' Romantics. The module highlights national and regional traditions within `British¿ Romanticism while also exploring writers' imaginative engagement with the wider world.
Black Writing in Britain from the 18th Century to the PresentESH287Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30This module examines a selection of works by black writers published in Britain from the eighteenth century to the present day, considered in the context of empire and its demise, the migration of people to Britain from the colonised and formerly colonised world, the racist nationalism of the decades following WWII, and the more contemporary phenomena of asylum-seeking and terror. The course¿s expansive conception of `black¿ writing ¿ encompassing African, Caribbean, Asian and first- and second-generation black British and British Asian writers ¿ is one which we will historically and politically contextualise, and at times contest, as we go along. Drawing on contemporary cultural, postcolonial and feminist theories, we will explore how writers as diverse as Olaudah Equiano, Sam Selvon, Jackie Kay, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Ravinder Randhawa, Andrea Levy and Sunjeev Sahota have responded creatively to a changing British society. We will consider in detail the stylistic and formal properties of a diverse range of texts written by black writers in Britain, from realist novels to criticism to experimental poetry and film, and we will investigate the politics of publishing this writing in Britain. At the same time, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which questions of national and `racial¿ identity, cultural and religious difference, class and gender, historical narrative, language, form and genre, are addressed and contested. The course is broadly chronological, aiming to give students an understanding of the literature in its historical and cultural context, tracing shifts in the social and political, as well as literary, landscape of Britain
Black Writing in Britain from the 18th Century to the Present IESH287ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module examines a selection of works by black writers published in Britain from the eighteenth century to the late twentietn century, considered in the context of empire and its demise, the migration of people to Britain from the colonised and formerly colonised world, and the racist nationalism of the decades following WWII. The course¿s expansive conception of `black¿ writing ¿ encompassing African, Caribbean, Asian and first- and second-generation black British and British Asian writers ¿ is one which we will historically and politically contextualise, and at times contest, as we go along. Drawing on contemporary cultural, postcolonial and feminist theories, we will explore how writers as diverse as Olaudah Equiano, Sam Selvon, Hanif Kureishi, Jackie Kay, Linton Kwesi Johnson and Ravinder Randhawa have responded creatively to a changing British society. We will explore in detail the stylistic and formal properties of a diverse range of literature written by black writers in Britain, from realist novels to criticism to experimental poetry, and we will investigate the politics of publishing this writing in Britain. At the same time, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which questions of national and `racial¿ identity, cultural and religious difference, class and gender, historical narrative, language, form and genre, are addressed and contested. The course is broadly chronological, aiming to give students an understanding of the literature in its historical and cultural context, tracing shifts in the social and political, as well as literary, landscape of Britain.
Representing London: Writing the Eighteenth Century CityESH288Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30London in the eighteenth century was the first recognisably `modern¿ city, the metropolitan centre of a global trading empire, the `Emporium of the World¿. There had never been a city like it. For this reason, poets, artists, novelists, playwrights, travel writers, satirists, and essayists were drawn persistently to London as a fascinating and complex subject for literary representation. There were few established precedents for how cities might be imagined through text. Solving the problem of how to represent the diverse, enigmatic, ever-changing city of London is one of the core literary questions that we ask on this module. But the city also sponsored its own local textual forms. Some of these were rooted in folk traditions reaching to time immemorial: ballad-singing, the pop-up theatres of the city¿s fairs. Others emerged in response to the demands of the new city: criminal biography, spy literature, the newspaper press, the satirical essay, the novel itself. Representing London gives you the opportunity to think about the way in which the diverse urban experience of the metropolitan populace finds expression in literature. Assessment tasks include an opportunity to write creatively about the city. Weekly teaching sessions combine close analysis of set texts with the study of visual material, the theoretical interrogation of the idea of the city, and field-trips to important urban sites.
Representing London: Writing the Eighteenth Century City IESH288ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115London in the eighteenth century was the first recognisably `modern¿ city, the metropolitan centre of a global trading empire, the `Emporium of the World¿. There had never been a city like it. For this reason, poets, artists, novelists, playwrights, travel writers, satirists, and essayists were drawn persistently to London as a fascinating and complex subject for literary representation. There were few established precedents for how cities might be imagined through text. Solving the problem of how to represent the diverse, enigmatic, ever-changing city of London is one of the core literary questions that we ask on this module. But the city also sponsored its own local textual forms. Some of these were rooted in folk traditions reaching to time immemorial: ballad-singing, the pop-up theatres of the city¿s fairs. Others emerged in response to the demands of the new city: criminal biography, spy literature, the newspaper press, the satirical essay, the novel itself. Representing London gives you the opportunity to think about the way in which the diverse urban experience of the metropolitan populace finds expression in literature. Assessment tasks include an opportunity to write creatively about the city. Weekly teaching sessions combine close analysis of set texts with the study of visual material, the theoretical interrogation of the idea of the city, and field-trips to important urban sites.
Representing London: Writing the Eighteenth Century City IIESH288BLevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215London in the eighteenth century was the first recognisably `modern¿ city, the metropolitan centre of a global trading empire, the `Emporium of the World¿. There had never been a city like it. For this reason, poets, artists, novelists, playwrights, travel writers, satirists, and essayists were drawn persistently to London as a fascinating and complex subject for literary representation. There were few established precedents for how cities might be imagined through text. Solving the problem of how to represent the diverse, enigmatic, ever-changing city of London is one of the core literary questions that we ask on this module. But the city also sponsored its own local textual forms. Some of these were rooted in folk traditions reaching to time immemorial: ballad-singing, the pop-up theatres of the city¿s fairs. Others emerged in response to the demands of the new city: criminal biography, spy literature, the newspaper press, the satirical essay, the novel itself. Representing London gives you the opportunity to think about the way in which the diverse urban experience of the metropolitan populace finds expression in literature. Assessment tasks include an opportunity to write creatively about the city. Weekly teaching sessions combine close analysis of set texts with the study of visual material, the theoretical interrogation of the idea of the city, and field-trips to important urban sites.
Thomas Hardy and the Victorian ModernESH300Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115Students will read a selection of four of Thomas Hardy's novels and a selection of his poetry in conjunction with selected contemporary scientific, social and aesthetic writings (Darwin, Arnold, Ruskin, J S Mill, Pater, The Life of Thomas Hardy by Florence Emily Hardy) and will consider relationships between them. We will consider issues of self-representation in Hardy's writings and will study techniques of prosody and of representation in fiction which have led Hardy to be describes as both Victorian and early modernist. This is a level six module which will draw on previous experience of writings of the period, and of earlier and later writers, in engagement with the concerns, tropes and techniques of Hardy's writings.
James Joyce's UlyssesESH314Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module will introduce students to James Joyce's Ulysses, which was first published in 1922. Students will analyse one or two chapters each week, and will be introduced to close reading skills in order to understand the formal properties of the book. For example, we will consider Joyce's use of interior monologue and manipulation of literary parody and pastiche. We will also discuss wider literary and historical questions, such as Joyce's depiction of Irish nationalism and representation of Jewishness. We will also look in some detail at the famous trial of Ulysses in 1921, in which the book was banned for obscenity.
Late Victorian LiteratureESH315Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module will introduce students to a wide range of different writings during the later part of the nineteenth-century including drama, poetry, art and literary criticism, the short story and the novel. Students will be encouraged to explore such issues as the construction of the self and personality, representation of the body, gender and sexuality, the figure of the artist, and degeneration as well as making a more general survey of the visual and literary imagination in the writings of the period. The module aims to build up confidence in approaching a wide variety of literary texts (including poetry) and to improve close reading skills.
Medieval TroyESH318Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115The ancient story of the Trojan war and the fall of Troy was current in the Middle Ages in many versions. Chaucer experimented with it in the form of Troilus and Criseyde, an account of the betrayal of the Trojan prince Troilus by Criseyde. This module will begin with a study of Chaucer's poem (in Middle English), and its use of ancient history to focus issues of moment in England in the late fourteenth century. It will continue with investigations of two fifteenth-century poems, John Lydgate's Troy Book and Robert Henryson's Testament of Cresseid, both of which respond to Chaucer's writing while at the same time exploring in other ways the matter of Troy.
Michel FoucaultESH319Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115Foucault's writings offer possible new histories of the subjects (mental illness, sexuality, discourses) that he tackled; they are also imaginative and undisciplined texts. In this module we read a selection of Foucault's major works, in translation, and consider some of the arguments they have provoked in literature, history and related modern disciplines. We will read some of Foucault's central texts until reading week; the second part of the module will open up more thematic and critical issues, such as the engagement of Foucault's work with that of Nietzsche, Derrida, Said and others.
Virginia WoolfESH330Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module tackles a broad selection of Woolf's writings: fictional, critical, polemical and autobiographical. We will look at how Woolf challenges conventional boundaries and definitions of types of writing. Philosophical, cultural, historical and psychological dimensions of Woolf's life and work will be addressed, as well as literary issues. These will include consciousness and the self; the representation of affect; truth in fiction; and Woolf's formal experimentation and diversity. The aim of the module will be to develop an understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of Woolf's writing.
Virginia WoolfESH330Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module tackles a broad selection of Woolf's writings: fictional, critical, polemical and autobiographical. We will look at how Woolf challenges conventional boundaries and definitions of types of writing. Philosophical, cultural, historical and psychological dimensions of Woolf's life and work will be addressed, as well as literary issues. These will include consciousness and the self; the representation of affect; truth in fiction; and Woolf's formal experimentation and diversity. The aim of the module will be to develop an understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of Woolf's writing.
Critical AestheticsESH338Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module provides an opportunity to explore the defining problems and questions of critical aesthetics. You are introduced to a variety of philosophical texts and are encouraged to use the arguments in these texts to formulate their own perspectives on the central questions of aesthetics.
British Culture in the 1950'sESH344Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module aims to introduce you to the variety of British cultural expression in the 1950s, including novels, poetry, drama, and television and film adaptations. The literature will be analysed in the context of a number of historical and social contexts: post-war austerity, the Festival of Britain, the development of post-imperial Britain, the Suez Crisis, Americanisation and the Cold War, the development of the Welfare State, the role of radio (the Third Programme) and television, the formation of the Arts Council. We will interrogate the critical assumption that the 1950s constituted a period of loss of confidence and ambition among British writers, and examine the range, styles and crucial reception of the literature of the decade. Writers studied will include George Orwell, Kingsley Amis, John Osborne, Doris Lessing, Iris Murdoch, Philip Larkin and Harold Pinter.
The Bible as/and LiteratureESH345Level 6 modules (Final year)Full year30The Bible is a continuing inter-textual presence in literary texts in English. It is itself a monumental literary work. This module will study the rhetorical strategies and narrative and poetic arts of biblical writing from the perspectives of literary criticism and theory. Students will become familiar with the history of English biblical translation and issues arising from it. The module will also study, with reference to selected texts, ways in which a range of post-medieval writers in English have engaged with biblical study or rhetoric.
Michel FoucaultESH319Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215Foucault's writings offer possible new histories of the subjects (mental illness, sexuality, discourses) that he tackled; they are also imaginative and undisciplined texts. In this module we read a selection of Foucault's major works, in translation, and consider some of the arguments they have provoked in literature, history and related modern disciplines. We will read some of Foucault's central texts until reading week; the second part of the module will open up more thematic and critical issues, such as the engagement of Foucault's work with that of Nietzsche, Derrida, Said and others.
The Revolution Controversy: Politics and GenreESH324Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module examines selected British contributions to the war of ideas which followed the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789. The Revolution debate involved a return to first principles, a reconsideration of the nature of society and the scope and meaning of rights, and a new emphasis on such issues as parliamentary representation, the role and rights of women, and the powers of the state. The presentation of these issues in novels, plays, political writing, and travel books of the 1790s will be considered in detail, with a particular emphasis on the ways in which literary practices and genres were transformed and politicised. Writers to be studied may include Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, Helen Maria Williams, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Mary Hays.
The Bible as/and Literature IESH345ALevel 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115The Bible is a continuing inter-textual presence in literary texts in English. It is itself a monumental literary work. This module will study the rhetorical strategies and narrative and poetic arts of biblical writing from the perspectives of literary criticism and theory. Students will become familiar with the history of English biblical translation and issues arising from it. The module will also study, with reference to selected texts, ways in which a range of post-medieval writers in English have engaged with biblical study or rhetoric.
Ancient Myth - Modern TheoryESH348Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115"We are all Greeks." (Shelley, Hellas) The myths of ancient Greece have long fascinated and perplexed scholars and intellectuals. In this module we shall examine some of those myths, and their influence on the Western intellectual tradition. The module aims to familiarise students with a number of theories to which they have given rise. Students will be encouraged to examine and critique these interpretations. "We are much less Greek than we believe." (Foucault, Discipline and Punish).
Modernism and DemocracyESH350Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module analyses the relationship between modernist writing and historical debates about the status of democracy. The module focuses on shifts towards mass democracy in the period of the early twentieth century, particularly focusing on the status of women and the working classes, the rights of nations to self-determination, and the impact of mass culture on art. It analyses the imaginative responses - some authoritarian, some radically individualist, some democratic - to these shifts towards political democracy.
Early Modern FantasiesESH360Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module will introduce students to the fantastic worlds of early modern Europe. We will read a variety of canonical and popular texts, examine art works and consider how history, geography, scientific experiment and religious belief was infused with fantasy and fiction in this period. The module is designed to encourage creative and independent research of an interdisciplinary nature. It builds on the historical knowledge developed at levels 1 and 2, but offers a new perspective on the early modern works of the imagination. It will also encourage students to think again about our own contemporary context, by revealing how blurred the line between fantasy and reality, fiction and scientific fact often was in the Renaissance. Topics of study may include, but are not limited to, the following: fantasies of style; fantastic voyages and brave new worlds; religious fervours: new ways of imagining God; scientific fictions I: alchemy, chemistry, and the wondrous new science; science fictions II: ghosts, demons and witches as scientific specimens; cabinets of curiosities; sexual fantasies: gender and desire; political fantasies; wonders and portents; theatrical fantasies.
The Caribbean NovelESH361Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module offers a broad survey of the Caribbean novel from the 1950s to the present. There is a vast body of work to read, though we will move through things slowly, reading very selectively. We will need to think where the Caribbean novel occurs (in the diaspora as much as in the Caribbean itself). And we will need to explore what specific characteristics underwrite the Caribbean form itself.
Shakespeare: the Play, the Word and the BookESH366Level 6 modules (Final year)Full year30This module examines Shakespeare's development as a dramatic artist and as a writer and will cover a range of his plays in detail. It enables you to move beyond reading the plays and situates his work within the specific historical contexts of stage history and print culture, it also examines the latest developments in Shakespeare criticism. We will consider the ways in which Shakespeare re-worked his source material, examine the dramatic and artistic contexts of the period, and look at the variety of ways in which his texts appeared in both performance and in print. During the second semester we will examine some of the problems involved in the transmission and editing of Shakespeare's texts, and the resulting implications for criticism and performance.
Shakespeare: the Play, the Word and the BookESH366ALevel 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module examines Shakespeare's development as a dramatic artist and as a writer and will cover a range of his plays in detail. It enables you to move beyond reading the plays and situates his work within the specific historical contexts of stage history and print culture, it also examines the latest developments in Shakespeare criticism. We will consider the ways in which Shakespeare re-worked his source material, examine the dramatic and artistic contexts of the period, and look at the variety of ways in which his texts appeared in both performance and in print. During the second semester we will examine some of the problems involved in the transmission and editing of Shakespeare's texts, and the resulting implications for criticism and performance.
Shakespeare: the Play, the Word and the BookESH366BLevel 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module examines Shakespeare's development as a dramatic artist and as a writer and will cover a range of his plays in detail. It enables you to move beyond reading the plays and situates his work within the specific historical contexts of stage history and print culture, it also examines the latest developments in Shakespeare criticism. We will consider the ways in which Shakespeare re-worked his source material, examine the dramatic and artistic contexts of the period, and look at the variety of ways in which his texts appeared in both performance and in print. During the second semester we will examine some of the problems involved in the transmission and editing of Shakespeare's texts, and the resulting implications for criticism and performance.
Writing the TroublesESH367Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module examines the literature of Northern Ireland in the context of debates about the role of the writer in time of civil war; representations of violence; theories of nation and nationalism; the city as partitioned cultural space; representations of the border. We will examine poetry, prose and drama, as well as consider representations of Northern Ireland on film. The focus will be on aesthetic representations of violence and civil breakdown, but students will be expected to engage closely with the history of the Troubles including the Civil Rights movement, the IRA campaign, the Hunger Strikes, Loyalist paramilitarism.
Modern Irish WritingESH368Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module will introduce students to the literature and society of early twentieth-century Ireland. We will begin by looking at the two founders of modern Irish writing, W.B. Yeats and James Joyce, in the context of the Literary Revival, the Easter Rebellion, and the founding of the new Irish state. We will consider the role of the Abbey Theatre, and the Irish National Theatre Society, through the riots associated with productions of works by J.M. Synge and Sean O'Casey. In the second half of the module we will examine the work of mid-century writers such as Samuel Beckett, Flann O'Brien, Elizabeth Bowen, Louis MacNeice, Patrick Kavanagh. Students will be asked to consider the nature of independence, the struggle between tradition and modernity, the role and representation of women in Irish society, representations of revolutionary violence and civil war, the role of religion.
Reading Psychoanalysis Reading LiteratureESH370Level 6 modules (Final year)Full year30This module will introduce students to psychoanalytic ideas and to psychoanalytically informed ways of reading and interpreting texts. Students should not worry if they have read no psychoanalysis before. We will spend a large part of the first weeks on Freud. Other psychoanalytic thinkers to be read might include: CJ Jung, Donald Winnicott, Melanie Klein and Frantz Fanon. We will then proceed to a series readings of literary works which either were in dialogue historically, or seem to offer the potential for dialogue, with psychoanalysis.
Victorian Sensation FictionESH380Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215Audiences could not get enough of the best-selling stories of bigamy, madness, and murder known as the sensation novel. This module will consider the Sensation Mania of the 1860s as a literary, historical, and psychological phenomenon reflecting many of the cultural anxieties of Victorian society. To this end, we will examine how a variety of sensation narratives participated in contemporary debates over sexuality and provided alternate ways of thinking about identity. Texts to be covered include the key novels to establish the genre of sensation fiction.
DH Lawrence: Controversy and LegacyESH381Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115The shadow cast by D.H. Lawrence over the history and study of literature in the 20th century is a long one. In his own lifetime, he engaged both positively and negatively with some of the most fashionable literary and intellectual currents of the day (he was, for example, both a Modernist and a Georgian poet, a Nietzschean and a critic of war, an Anti-Imperialist and a Primitivist). After his death, his writings were claimed for tradition of working-class writing in England, both for and against feminist campaigns against the suppression of female sexuality and for a new 'postcolonial' approach to early twentieth-century texts. Most famously the 'Lady Chatterley' trial in 1960 gained iconic significance as the event that marked the beginning of a new period of sexual freedom. This module aims to reconsider Lawrence's writings in the light of this history of rediscovery and controversy. It takes seriously (and where necessary not so seriously) Lawrence's claims to be a poet and a thinker, reading his philosophical writings alongside two of his models, Nietzsche and Schopenhauer, and traces the important shifts in his fiction writing from the early provincial stories to the later 'leadership' novels. It looks at influential responses to Lawrence in the 1950s and 60s and considers what these responses might reveal about how literary legacies are shaped and how this changes the way we read Lawrence's texts in the present.
Reading Childhood/Writing ChildrenESH382Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module is designed to introduce you to a wide range of literature written for, by and about children from antiquity to the present day. It will focus on all kinds of narratives and forms including novels, poetry, non-fiction and images. Each book will be read alongside some critical text or alternative material to provide a theoretical approach to the reading and critical assessment of the works studied. The module will give you an overview of ideas about children and the development of the critical theory of the `invention¿ of childhood. By dealing with discrete subjects (eg. ideas on education, ideas about origin and identity, children at work) writings will be studied by theme while distinctive historical and cultural assumptions in different periods will be taken into account. You will be asked to develop your own critical faculties and be given the tools to allow you to make critical judgements in comparing and contrasting the range of works under discussion.
Gender and Imagination in Victorian PoetryESH385Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215"Gender and Imagination in Victorian Poetry' examines a variety of different approaches to the visual, aesthetics, gender and sexuality in Victorian poetry. It explores connections between these areas and their significance to ideas of the poet and poetry in the Victorian period.

The module focuses on major male and female poets of the period - Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, Swinburne, Christina Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Thomas Hardy - but it also examines poems by less well-known figures such as Augusta Webster, May Probyn and Amy Levy. Related prose writings by John Stuart Mill, Walter Pater, John Ruskin and the poets themselves are also included, and are provided in extract form in the modulepack. Subjects for exploration include Victorian poets' treatment of the epipsyche (the beloved as reflection of the self), the feminisation of the nineteenth-century male poet, ideas and images of the female artist, and the significance of the figure of the I fallen woman' .
Time, Narrative and CultureESH387Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This is a module that asks how an understanding of narrative can inform a wider concept of culture, and specifically how an understanding of the strange temporal structures and time-experiments of contemporary fiction reflect or produce changes in the modern experience of time. It focuses on examples of backwards narration, flashforward, transhistorical jumps and fuzzy temporality alongside a range of philosophical and social theories of time. Given that narratology is the systematic study of narrative, and that narrative is everywhere, the module also aims to assess the social and philosophical scope of narratological concepts.
Milton: Revolutions in WritingESH390Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module offers an intensive study of the writing and thought of John Milton: possibly the most important author of the seventeenth century. At its heart is a detailed reading and discussion of Milton¿s great epic poem, Paradise Lost (1674). We will consider what Milton aimed to effect in writing and publishing Paradise Lost, and will study it in the context of the changes in society and religion that were taking place at the time. Milton was a political revolutionary; he was also a revolutionary writer, who attempted to carry out a thorough reform of English literature as well as of English society. In seminar discussions we will analyze Paradise Lost alongside some of Milton¿s other revolutionary writings, including his plea for the freedom of the press, Areopagitica (1644).
Feminism(s)ESH393Level 6 modules (Final year)Full year30This module engages witrh contemporary femninist thought, steering a course through the literary criticism, history and theory of feminism,. It examines the signifcant debates and key concept of feminist thought through a range of literary, political and philosophical texts and encourages students to develop their own critical understanding of gender and equality issues in the contemporary period. Students are invited to explore the impact of feminism approaches on literary criticism, to understand the critical feminist project in its own terms, and to examine feminism in relation in Marxism, psychoanalysis, sexuality, post-structuralism, neo-liberalism and international feminism.
Feminism(s)ESH393ALevel 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module is to be taken by Semester One-only Associate students.
This module steers a course through the literary criticism, history and theory of feminism, from early feminist texts, to the contemporary period (although the focus will be mainly twentieth and twenty-first century).
Feminism(s)ESH393BLevel 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module is to be taken by Semester Two only Associate students in the Department of English.
The module covers a number of different aspects of twentieth and twenty-first century feminism(s) from psychoanalysis, to the body, from queer theory, to the future of feminism.
Writing Modern LondonESH394Level 6 modules (Final year)Full year30This module aims to develop your understanding of the role of literary texts in producing and contesting modern urban experience. By exploring a selected body of novels and other texts (poetry, short stories, letters, essays), considered with reference to the changing environment of London, and we shall explore together how writers have imagined the modern city in the context of (for example) war and the Blitz, urban crime, class conflict, the relationship between suburbs and city, and the changes wrought by the end of the Bristish empire, post-war immigration, and ongoing social and cultural change. We will explore both dystopic future and historical past revisionings of the city; and consider the ways in which London has served as a site, over the past century, for writers to consider or contest changing notations of Britain and Britishness. The module aims to develop skills in the literary analysis of texts in relation to place, both in writing and in group discussion, and to develop critical thinking and the effective communication of ideas and argument.
Writing Modern LondonESH394ALevel 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module aims to devlop your understanding of the role of literary texts in producing and contesting modern urban experience, By exploring a selected boy of novels and other texts (poetry, short stories, letters, essays), considered with reference to the changing environment of London, we shall explore together how writers have imagined the modern city in the context of (for example) war and the Blitz, urban crime, class conflict, the relationship between suburbs and city and ongoing social and cultural change. We will explore the ways in which London has served as a site, between 1900 and the 1950s, for writers to consider or contest changing notions of Britain and Britishness. The module aims to develop skills in the literary communication of ideas and argument.
Romantic Travellers in EuropeESH396Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215In both prose and poetry, in diaries, letters and fiction, many Romantic writers chronicled their travels on the European continent and their impressions of foreign customs and characteristics. This course will provide an intimate survey of this varied literature. Opening up questions such as whether pedestrian travel was an exciting allurement or a hard necessity, and to what extent travel offered release from social or familial constraints, discussion will address Romantic writers' self-fashioning in their travel narratives, and the roles of gender and class.
English Research DissertationESH6000Level 6 modules (Final year)Full year30The English Research Dissertation provides an opportunity for you to complete an in-depth research project within any aspect of the discipline of English Studies as it is taught at Queen Mary. You will be encouraged to pursue your own intellectual interests and supported in designing a project proposal via weekly workshops at the start of your final year. You will then engage in self-led research directed towards the completion of an assessed 10,000 word dissertation. Each student will be supervised in this undertaking from the mid-point of Semester A onwards by an identified member of the academic staff.
ShakespeareESH101Level 4 modules (First year)Full year30This introductary module offers students the opportunity to study up to nine of Shakespeare's plays in their original theatrical and historical contexts. Plays currently on the syllabus include Richard III, Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, As You Like It, Henry V, Othello, The Tempest (although this is subject to change year on year). You will be given a standing ticket for at least one production of one of the set plays at Shakespeare's Globe on Bankside, London in the first few weeks of the module, at no extra cost. The teaching is delivered as large one-hour lectures, followed by one hour small-group seminars. The lectures are prepared and delivered in the lecture hall by two lecturers who interact with one another and the audience, They combine close reading of the texts with use of video clips from productions put on at Shakespeare's Globe and other filmed productions in order to encourage the students to read them not just as words on the page but as live events in the theatre. The small-group seminars encourage preparation and discussion online during the week and concentrate on close reading the plays. There will be three coursework assessments followed by an end of year examination. The assessments will ask you to paraphrase and contextualise selected passages from the plays and to write essays based on analysis of particular scenes.
Iraqi Literature in English / English TranslationESH6002Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215The last ten years has seen a proliferation of Iraqi fiction in English translation and some Anglophone Iraqi literature ; this is no doubt linked to almost a decade of increased interest in Iraq since the 2003 invasion by Allied troops and the subsequent fall of the Baathist regime. This presents an opportunity to introduce students of world literatures without knowledge of the Arabic language to Iraqi literature and its historical contexts. Using the First World War, the Iran-Iraq war and the two Gulf Wars as foci, this course examines Iraqi responses to the conflicts that have ¿ quite literally ¿ defined Iraq. The first part of this course focuses on responses the First World War. The Mesopotamian campaign was the first invasion of what was then Mesopotamia by British (and Indian) troops; this conflict led directly to the creation of the Kingdom of Iraq and the British Mandate in Iraq. The second part of the course examines literary responses to the Iran-Iraq war. This conflict profoundly changed Iraqi society, initiating a period of economic and societal change and a shift in the levels of violence and other repression Saddam Hussein¿s government inflicted upon its own people. The final section of the course examines Iraqi responses to the two Gulf Wars and the period of sanctions in between. The last two decades have seen a mass exodus from Iraq; despite a more stable political situation, Iraq has yet to recover from the loss, in particular, of its educated middle classes and intelligentsia. This last section will consider changing conceptions of home by a growing diaspora ¿ a section of Iraqi society disproportionately represented in translated works ¿ and the responses of those who chose, or are forced, to remain in Iraq to the years following the fall Sadam Hussein¿s regime.
High and Low ModernsESH6003Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module introduces a broad range of literary and cultural production from Britain in the 1920s and 30s, including: pulp fiction, middlebrow writing, journalism, advertising, science fiction, radio and cinema. The focus across these different media will be on how different authors conceive of audiences as a site of conflict or negotiation between 'high' and 'low' culture. We will be especially concerned with the depiction of audiences as consumers of new and old media, and with the diverse uses of science and technology for high-, middle- and lowbrow ends. We will also question the categorisation of literature and culture in these vertical terms and ask what the alternatives might be.
American Money Novels 1793-1930.ESH6018Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115We will explore the great American subject of money from the foundations of the Republic to the Jazz Age in the fictions of capital, thrift, production, high finance, self-sufficiency, and fraud. The semester will be roughly divided into four sections (Making It, Robber-Barons, Girl-Power, and Voices Like Money, each section of three or four weeks) that allow a big range of reading, thematically organised. The module will also be roughly, but not rigidly, chronological, in order to give students without a lot of experience of American literature a sense of what¿s there to be investigated. There will be a lecture each week, which will introduce the themes and work under scrutiny, followed by a seminar.
Herman Melville's 'Moby Dick'ESH6020Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215'Moby Dick' is one of the great books of the English language, and also one of the most enigmatic and paradoxical. On one hand, the book features one of the most famous plots in world literature; on the other, great swathes of it are largely 'plotless,' being devoted to asides, mini-essays and philosophical discussion. As a nineteenth century text written in the United States, it has much to say about its time and place of composition, but also much to say that chimes with earlier and non-American writing, as well as later literature up to and beyond the time of modernism. The first half of this module is devoted to intensive reading of 'Moby Dick,' and the second to texts that respond to the book and which Melville responds to. Students taking this module will thus gain access to a fascinating text, and knowledge of its myriad contexts.
Shakespeare IESH101ALevel 4 modules (First year)Sem 115This introductary module offers students the opportunity to study up to five of Shakespeare's plays in their original theatrical and historical contexts. Plays currently on the syllabus include Richard III, Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar (although this is subject to change year on year). You will be given a standing ticket for at least one production of one of the set plays at Shakespeare's Globe on Bankside, London in the first few weeks of the module, at no extra cost. The teaching is delivered as large one-hour lectures, followed by one hour small-group seminars. The lectures are prepared and delivered in the lecture hall by two lecturers who interact with one another and the audience, They combine close reading of the texts with use of video clips from productions put on at Shakespeare's Globe and other filmed productions in order to encourage the students to read them not just as words on the page but as live events in the theatre. The small-group seminars encourage preparation and discussion online during the week and concentrate on close reading the plays. There will be two coursework assessments, one to be submitted in the first half of the module, the other by the last week of the module. The first will ask you to paraphrase and contextualise a selected passage from the plays, and the second will ask you to write an essay based on analysis of particular scenes.
ShakespeareESH101BLevel 4 modules (First year)Sem 215This introductory module offers students the opportunity to study up to five of Shakespeare's plays in their original theatrical and historical contexts. Plays currently on the syllabus include Hamlet, As You Like It, Henry V, Othello and The Tempest (though this is subject to change year-on-year). The teaching is delivered as large one-hour lectures, followed by one hour small-group seminars. The lectures are prepared and delivered in the lecture hall by two lecturers who interact with one another and the audience. They combine close reading of the texts with use of video clips from productions put on at Shakespeare's Globe (on Bankside in London) and other filmed productions in order to encourage students to read them not just as words on the page but as live events in the theatre. The small-group seminars encourage preparation and discussion online during the week and concentrate on close reading the plays. There will be two coursework assessments, one to be submitted in the first half of the module, the other by the last week of the module. The first will ask you to paraphrase and contextualise a selected passage from the plays, and the second will ask you to write an essay based on analysis of particular scenes.
Reading, Theory and Interpretation: Approaches to the Study of English LiteratureESH102Level 4 modules (First year)Full year30'Reading, Theory and Interpretation' is a foundational module that will introduce you to some of the central problems involved in the interpretation of literature. At the same time, the module will provide you with an introduction to some of the most influential and challenging theories of interpretation itself. Throughout the history of literature, there have arisen various competing interpretations of literary texts and, with that, the need to adjudicate between rival interpretations from interdisciplinary backgrounds, including Marxism, gender studies, postcolonial theory, and psychoanalysis.

'Theory' has therefore emerged as a means of justifying particular interpretations over and against others. This module will demonstrate the connections between different theoretical perspectives within English Literature, and aims to help you to understand why these opposing ¿readings¿, theoretical perspectives, and interpretations occur, and how to analyse some of the more ambitious and compelling theories through which these readings have been generated. The module will introduce you to a range of British and World Literature written in English, and will consider the role of English Literature within its cultural and global contexts.
Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama IESH6023Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115On this module you will study and compare plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries, in relation both to the theatres and audiences which staged and saw them, and the societies and social processes they represented. It is suitable for single honours English students who took Renaissance Drama in the second year and/or Shakespeare in the first year, as well as for joint honours English and Drama, and English and History students. You will see a production of a play by one of Shakespeare's contemporaries at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, the Jacobean-style indoor theatre now open alongside Shakespeare's Globe (ticket free of charge). The regular teaching will consist of two-week blocks comparing two plays in relation to general social processes such as courting and marrying, dying and mourning, and other more particular ones such as the making of witches. In each two-week block, the first week will be a 3-hour lecture discussion and the second week will be a two-hour seminar. You will work together in groups to prepare the seminar. We will deploy concepts from anthropology such as 'rites of passage', as well as concepts from theatre criticism and social history. So, for example, we might compare Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus and Hamlet as plays about death and mourning, Shakespeare's Macbeth and Marlowe's Doctor Faustus as plays about the social process of diabolical temptation, and the meanings and values of theatrical illusion. Other plays that may feature include Shakespeare's King Lear and Middleton's The Changeling, but the curriculum will vary each year depending on what is on at the Wanamaker theatre.
Laughing Matters: Comedy and Contemporary CultureESH6025Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115Has contemporary culture taken a funny turn? This module offers you the chance to find out. We will look at the recent proliferation of comic novels and short stories, as well as stand-up comedy, sitcoms and film, in order to ask questions such as: why is this funny? how is this funny? should we be laughing at this? and what does this type of comedy say about the contemporary moment? We will also study the theory and philosophy of comedy, using this to inform our understanding of what comedy and laughter do, culturally, psychologically, ethically and politically.
Laughing Matters: Comedy and Contemporary CultureESH6025Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215Has contemporary culture taken a funny turn? This module offers you the chance to find out. We will look at the recent proliferation of comic novels and short stories, as well as stand-up comedy, sitcoms and film, in order to ask questions such as: why is this funny? how is this funny? should we be laughing at this? and what does this type of comedy say about the contemporary moment? We will also study the theory and philosophy of comedy, using this to inform our understanding of what comedy and laughter do, culturally, psychologically, ethically and politically.
Writing MuslimsESH6026Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215In the wake of the Rushdie affair, and especially following 9/11 and 7/7, Muslims have come to figure increasingly as secular modernity¿s fundamentalist Other. Beginning with Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses and the controversy it sparked, the module will consider a range of contemporary literary representations of Muslims in the context of ongoing debate about the place of Islam in multicultural and largely secular western societies. We will explore how writers of Muslim heritage have responded to and reframed this context, focusing for example on the role of Islam in shaping identity; Islamophobic racism and strategies of anti-racism; the politics of free speech; terror and the `war on terror¿; and how race, gender, class, migration and generation impact on and intersect with Muslim identities. As well as developing skills in literary analysis, the module aims to foster an interdisciplinary approach to the texts; we will read them in relation to events that have placed Muslims in the spotlight as well as media coverage of these events, and alongside theoretical and critical material from a range of disciplines.
Solitude in Life and Literature in Enlightenment BritainESH6028Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115Solitude is an eternal dimension of human experience, but how it is conceived and represented changes over time. In Enlightenment Britain solitude was controversial. Widespread concern about the psychological and moral impact of capitalism prompted fears about the unregulated passions of the lone individual. `Commercial society¿, it was said, was isolating people, turning them into `detached and solitary beings¿ preoccupied with their own interests and indifferent to their fellow beings. Against this, defenders of solitude portrayed it as a site of personal authenticity and creativity, set apart from the shallow and corrupting vanities of `the world¿. These divergent views of solitude appeared in a wide variety of writings, including memoirs, philosophical works, novels, periodicals, travel writings, and of course poetry, the genre mostly closely identified with the valorisation of solitude, although here too anti-solitude sentiments intruded. This module examines these competing visions of solitude in Enlightenment Britain and the cultural and intellectual developments that contributed to them. It is a seminar-based course: each week students are provided with a selection of primary source materials for analysis and discussion. Works by influential writers on solitude, including Daniel Defoe, Lord Shaftesbury, Edward Young, David Hume, Dr Johnson, William Wordsworth , Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley, are studied in relation to the changing forms and meanings of solitude in a modernising society.
Literatures in Time: Texts and Contexts from the Eighth to the Sixteenth CenturyESH110Level 4 modules (First year)Full year30This module will introduce students to the foundations of English literature, from Beowulf to the love poetry of the Tudor court. It will give them a sense of the historical, political, social and literary developments over this long period, thoroughly contextualizing works within their cultural and intertextual fields. It will include eight centuries of writing in England, and some influential continental works in the French of England brought over by William the Conqueror. Many of these texts will be available in modern English translations, but students will also be given experience of reading and working with original forms of the varieties of Middle English which developed over the period. This period saw unceasing political and social upheaval, and new literary forms were constantly created and developed. The Middle Ages witnessed the reinvention of fiction as a narrative form; the development of poetry in all forms, from the epic verse to the love sonnet; the emergence of drama; the invention of printing, and the progressive use of writing as a political weapon available to all. It also saw the English language take shape, and English literature acquire an identity of its own. Over the year, this module will give students a growing understanding of the purposes and effects, conscious and unconscious, of literary production and development; and this understanding will be rooted in the historical moment.
Literatures in Time: Texts and Contexts from the Eighth to the Sixteenth CenturyESH110ALevel 4 modules (First year)Sem 115This module will introduce students to the foundations of English literature, from Beowulf to the love poetry of the Tudor court. It will give them a sense of the historical, political, social and literary developments over this long period, thoroughly contextualizing works within their cultural and intertextual fields. It will include eight centuries of writing in England, and some influential continental works in the French of England brought over by William the Conqueror. Many of these texts will be available in modern English translations, but students will also be given experience of reading and working with original forms of the varieties of Middle English which developed over the period. This period saw unceasing political and social upheaval, and new literary forms were constantly created and developed. The Middle Ages witnessed the reinvention of fiction as a narrative form; the development of poetry in all forms, from the epic verse to the love sonnet; the emergence of drama; the invention of printing, and the progressive use of writing as a political weapon available to all. It also saw the English language take shape, and English literature acquire an identity of its own. Over the year, this module will give students a growing understanding of the purposes and effects, conscious and unconscious, of literary production and development; and this understanding will be rooted in the historical moment.
NarrativeESH123Level 4 modules (First year)Sem 215This module introduces students to the key elements of narrative techniques. Using a selection of novels and shorter fiction from the nineteenth century to the present day, it focuses on formal aspects of narrative (narration, character, plot etc) to examine how novels work on their readers. It provides students with the conceptual tools, technical terminology and a range of approaches for analysing prose fiction.
PoetryESH124Level 4 modules (First year)Sem 115This module introduces students to English poetry as poetry, Working across period boundaries, it itntroduces the main forms and genres of poetry, their cultural connotations, and the uses poets have made of them. It will help you to make sense of how poetry works, why poets make the choices they do, and how poetic experiences emerge from the conjunction of linguistics intentions with sound, rhythm, the body, the audience and the frameworks of social convention.
Heroes and Outlaws in History and Fiction, 1100-1600ESH6029Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module explores the representations of a range of heroes and outlaws, both real and legendary, in literary and historical texts written in England from the twelfth to the sixteenth century. We will study tales of some of medieval England¿s most famous heroes outside of the Arthurian tradition, along with stories of Robin Hood and other outlaws, tracing the roots of the Robin Hood legend in earlier narratives. We will investigate how accounts of these heroes and outlaws developed across time, and how they took shape in different regions, languages, genres, and material forms. We will consider themes of identity, otherness, monstrosity, Englishness, violence, chivalry and justice, as we explore how accounts of England¿s heroes and outlaws blur the distinctions between these categories, testing the limits of the human and the law.

Students will be expected to read Middle English texts in their original language. Medieval French and Latin sources will be made available in translation.
British Fictions of the1960sESH6030Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module introduces debates around the fiction of the 1960s by way of a focus on the more experimental novels of well-known writers of the time such as Anthony Burgess, Iris Murdoch, Muriel Spark, Angela Carter and J.G. Ballard, as well as the self-styled `modernist¿ group led by B.S. Johnson and Ann Quin. The module looks at how this experimentalism interacted with that traditional strength of British post-war fiction: social realism, producing a distinctive strand of British fiction in the 1960s.
Jane Austen and Her ContextsESH6032Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115Jane Austen (1775-1817) is one of the greatest English novelists and, since the First World War, has become a national icon. This module provides an opportunity for in-depth study of her six full-length novels. It explores the various ways in which she transformed the genre of the women's domestic novel into a vehicle for social analysis and commentary. Her novels are full of signs which conveyed to her contemporaries opinions about economics, class, religion, and politics. We shall decode those signs and explore their significance.
South African Literature & Culture: Apartheid Modernities, Post-Apartheid PossibilitiesESH6033Level 6 modules (Final year)Full year30This module introduces students to a range of writing and contemporary cultural production from apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa, material engaging with the legacies of a long period of inter- and intra-racial oppression and violence, and negotiating the complexities of gendered, ethnic, racial, and linguistic identity in a heterogeneous postcolonial society. Students will, under expert supervision, engage with this material¿s historical and political circumstances, and with methodological and theoretical frameworks for studying postcolonial cultural production in a fascinating regional context.
South African Literature & Culture: Apartheid Modernities, Post-Apartheid PossibilitiesESH6033ALevel 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module introduces students to a range of writing and contemporary cultural production from apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa, material engaging with the legacies of a long period of inter- and intra-racial oppression and violence, and negotiating the complexities of gendered, ethnic, racial, and linguistic identity in a heterogeneous postcolonial society. Students will, under expert supervision, engage with this material¿s historical and political circumstances, and with methodological and theoretical frameworks for studying postcolonial cultural production in a fascinating regional context.
Cultures of Inequality: Narrating Class 1815-1914ESH6034Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module will address nineteenth-century inequality, a topic that has returned to the mainstream of British public discourse demonstrably in recent years through the comparative analysis of socio-economic stratification between now and then offered by thinkers such as Thomas Piketty. Students will learn to reflect upon the complex web of material and cultural practices that are implicated in the construction of class identity, exploring how work, leisure, housing, fashion, taste, accent etc all interrelate to signify relative positions within shifting and overlapping fields of power. Students will learn to recognise popular fiction from this period as one of the modes through which new forms of inequality became both naturalized and challenged; as an important means by which an evolving class consciousness was disseminated and modified. Key theories and historiographies of class will be explored in conjunction with sustained readings of nineteenth-century literature.
English in PracticeESH125Level 4 modules (First year)Sem 10English in Practice supports students in the transition to university-level study through a series of induction events, masterclasses, and workshops. The module introduces you to information and practices central to negotiating the first year (and beyond) successfully, including, for example: who¿s who; navigating QMUL¿s online learning environment; accessing support; time management; digital resources and research; reading critically; writing, editing, referencing and good academic practice, and making the most of feedback. The module will make use of `real world¿ examples by drawing on issues, skills and assessments from other modules at Level 4. In different years and according to need, the balance between large-group lecture-style sessions and smaller-group workshops may vary, but the total number of teaching hours will remain the same.
Imagination and Knowledge: English Romantic Literature, 1770-1825 IESH201ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115The module traces the literary history of romantic literature as a productive debate between the logic of reason and the insight of imagination in a period when both rationality and intuition were themselves being defined and narrated as the `spirit of the age'. This debate was expressed most often as the tension between the claims of social and personal responsibility and desire. Novels, polemics, poems, and memoirs share a set of ambitions (the apotheosis of the self, the righting of social wrongs, the humanising of religion, the creation of an utterly original and authentic poetry) and fears (the immolation of the self through political revolution, and the destruction of the imagination by either scientific control or by unbridled sexual and aggressive instincts). We will discuss texts by Wordsworth, Coleridge, Wollstonecraft, Barbauld, Blake, Robinson, Spence, DeQuincey, Shelley, Keats, Lamb, Hazlitt and Clare.
Argument and AddressESH204Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module is intended as an introduction to rhetorical theory and practice. The module will provide a foundation in the principles of argument, with particular reference to classical treatises on rhetoric, but the main emphasis will be on the practical analysis of argument as a key element in a variety of texts and forms of utterance, including letters (both public and familiar), essays, sermons, pamphlets, and speeches, as well as some more obviously literary examples.
Dickens and the CityESH208Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215Dickens is above all London's novelist. The module will explore, through the critical study of four of Dickens's major novels and several shorter writings, Dickens's representation of London and his use of fiction to urge social or political reform. You will read contemporary writings by Henry Mayhew, Thomas Carlyle, Friedrich Engels, and others in order to situate Dickens¿s fiction within a context of current opinion, documentation and debate. Maps will be used in class; the Dickens Walk and the group project will require walking exploration of the City. You are advised to keep a map at hand to clarify for yourselves the locations used in Dickens's writings.
ModernismESH213Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30This module introduces you to the style, history, politics and controversies of modernism. We will read central modernist texts such as Joyce's 'Ulysses', Eliot's 'The Waste Land', and Woolf's 'To the Lighthouse', alongside a selection of modernist and modern writers, critics, journalists and intellectuals. In the first semester, we will see how modernism developed in the 1910s and 20s, and examine a range of contexts for its stylistic experiments in narrative and point of view, in urban life, war, sexual emancipation, and psychology. In the second semester, we will focus on the novel and its relation to time, history and new technologies of film and recording. We will then look at some examples of modernism in America including modernism's presence in African American culture.
Modernism IESH213ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module introduces you to the style, history, politics and controversies of modernism. We will read central modernist texts such as Joyce's 'Ulysses', Eliot's 'The Waste Land', and Woolf's 'To the Lighthouse', alongside a selection of modernist and modern writers, critics, journalists and intellectuals. Over eleven weeks, we will see how modernism developed in the 1910s and 20s, and examine a range of contexts for its stylistic experiments in narrative and point of view, in urban life, war, sexual emancipation, and psychology.
Samuel Pepys and his World: Living and Writing in Restoration LondonESH6035Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215In this module we encounter the life and literature of Restoration London through the eyes of Samuel Pepys, who experienced London at its most apocalyptic (the Plague and the Fire) and London at its most ordinary. Pepys was curious about almost everything he witnessed and in his diary he recorded his reactions to plays and playhouses, Parliament and the royal court, and the worlds of books, music, and science. Each week we will read extracts from the diary alongside texts by Pepys¿s contemporaries, including examples of drama, life-writing, news, comedy, scientific writing, satire, poetry, and libertine literature.
Contemporary American Popular CultureESH6036Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module focuses on critical approaches to contemporary American popular culture. We will question the importance of popular culture to our experiences of the present, ask after the relationship between contemporary literature and more popular forms, and finally, evaluate how popular culture might be understood as 'thinking' or 'theorizing' the contemporary. As well as drawing on and developing skills in literary analysis, the module will foster an interdisciplinary approach to the contemporary, asking: Why is the popular important and what can it tell us about contemporary America? How might we conceptualize popular culture as `theory¿? How is contemporary literature related to other, more popular forms? The module will be an opportunity to look at a mix of literary texts, reality television, film, podcasts, and aspects of digital culture, developing an interdisciplinary frame for thinking contemporary America.
Contemporary American Popular CultureESH6036Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215This module focuses on critical approaches to contemporary American popular culture. We will question the importance of popular culture to our experiences of the present, ask after the relationship between contemporary literature and more popular forms, and finally, evaluate how popular culture might be understood as 'thinking' or 'theorizing' the contemporary. As well as drawing on and developing skills in literary analysis, the module will foster an interdisciplinary approach to the contemporary, asking: Why is the popular important and what can it tell us about contemporary America? How might we conceptualize popular culture as `theory¿? How is contemporary literature related to other, more popular forms? The module will be an opportunity to look at a mix of literary texts, reality television, film, podcasts, and aspects of digital culture, developing an interdisciplinary frame for thinking contemporary America.
Thresholds of America: The Spatial Imaginary in American Fiction since 1930ESH6037Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 215From regional fiction of the American South, to Harlem's centrality to jazz culture, to Los Angeles' importance to American postmodernism, to re-imaginations of the South in post-Katrina fiction, American fiction of the last century might be explored through a focus on the topic of space and spacial imaginaries. Beginning with John Dos Passos' 'The 42nd Parallel' and ending with Claudia Rankine's' Citizen: An American Lyric', this module will consider a range of modern and contemporary American fictions to explore how an attention to spatiality might focus critical attention upon America in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will explore how American fiction is abundant with spatial imagery and concerns: from the more literal examples of borders, specific cities and regions; to more abstract considerations of inclusion, exclusion, and crossings; to, finally, the spatiality of figures such as the citizen, the immigrant, the dissident, the subversive, and the queer. As well as developing skills in literary analysis, the module aims to foster an interdisciplinary approach to exploring the spatial imaginary of America, considering other forms of media alongside the literary as well as theoretical and critical material from a range of disciplines.
Genres of American Writing since 2000ESH6039Level 6 modules (Final year)Sem 115This module will offer you the opportunity to engage in a focused programme of study for approaching the formal ambitions, political commitments, and thematic diversity of contemporary American fiction and life-writing. The syllabus of texts will be organized according to genre rather than chronologically, so that the module encourages you to move between, and observe affinities among, a variety of post-millennial writers. Considering both established and emerging figures, the seminars will range from post-apocalyptic thrillers, reconfigurations of romance and tragedy, to new innovations in genre after postmodernism. A pack of secondary materials accompanies the module, anthologizing important critical and theoretical interventions that offer key vocabularies for discussing the development of North American writing today.
Nineteenth Century Aesthetic Prose: a Writing Intensive CourseESH214Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module will offer students the opportunity to reflect on and work on their own writing through engagement with a range of aesthetic writers from the period 1860 - 1900. Students will learn about different kinds of aesthetic prose such as art criticism, literary appreciation, autobiography, travel writing and the short story and give special attention to the topic of style. Students will have the opportunity to work creatively on a variety of short exercises, which will be single- marked by the module leader and returned for revision. For the formal assessment students will submit a portfolio of 4 revised pieces accompanied by a log-book in which they are expected to record their reflections on each class and on the prescribed reading and exercises.
Satire, Scandal and Society 1700-1740ESH223Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115This module examines the role played by satire and satirists in the cultural debates of the early eighteenth century, introducing students to modes of satire in a variety of genres. The module traces the genealogy of English Augustan satire and explores the ways in which classical models are imitated and adapted in response to the challenges of an increasingly commercial society. We will consider how the idea of $ùGrub Street reflects satirists anxieties about the innovative energy of a modern and supposedly debased literary culture. The module will also examine new forms of satiric writing in the period (such as scandal and gossip) and the social construction of the satirist, and will treat as central the question of the gendered status of satire.
Text, Art and Performance in LondonESH227Level 5 modules (Second year)Sem 215This is an event-based module, which examines the role of text in art, performance, installations, and public spaces in the city - specifically London. The primary focus is always the analysis of words and texts, how they are used to revise old stories, to tell new stories, to explain, to celebrate, to underline, to persuade, to enhance the environment. Beyond that the premise of the module will be to open out into questions about the presentation of art objects, the function of the word in the everyday, the exploitation of texts in performance, the relation between words and other art forms of communication.
Women Writing in the Romantic PeriodESH230Level 5 modules (Second year)Full year30In this module we will focus on what it meant to be a woman writing in the Romantic period: what opportunities and constraints did a female author face compared to her father, brother, husband or friend? We will begin by examining contemporary views about the kind of education women should receive, and ideas of femininity that influenced their writing. Then will read a range of novels, poems and other works, considering how women writers negotiate with the conventional limits of propriety, how they adapt established literary conventions for their own use, how they explore through realism, romance and fantasy the roles and opportunities available to women within the domestic sphere, and how they engage with public issues such as slavery. Authors studied on the module may include: Anna Barbauld, Maria Edgeworth, Elizabeth Inchbald, Ann Radcliffe, Mary Shelley, Charlotte Smith, and Germaine de Staël, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Dorothy Wordsworth. During the second semester there will be an opportunity to focus in depth on a smaller selection of writers. Not open to Associate Students who are at Queen Mary for semester 2 only.
Women Writing in the Romantic Period IESH230ALevel 5 modules (Second year)Sem 115In this module we will focus on what it meant to be a woman writing in the Romantic period: what opportunities and constraints did a female author face compared to her father, brother, husband or friend? We will begin by examining contemporary views about the kind of education women should receive, and ideas of femininity that influenced their writing. Then will read a range of novels, poems and other works, considering how women writers negotiate with the conventional limits of propriety, how they adapt established literary conventions for their own use, how they explore through realism, romance and fantasy the roles and opportunities available to women within the domestic sphere, and how they engage with public issues such as slavery.

 

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